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Origins of the Violin - The Vielle

The vielle appears in 13th century France and differs from the rebec significantly. There are now 5 strings, the body is much larger and closer in shape to the modern violin with ribs to enable greater flexibility when bowed. It is worth noting that the name vielle came later to refer to a different instrument--vielle à rue (vielle à roue)--or as it is more commonly known now--hurdy gurdy.



The vielle /viˈɛl/ is a European bowed stringed instrument used in the Medieval period, similar to a modern violin but with a somewhat longer and deeper body, three to five gut strings, and a leaf-shaped pegbox with frontal tuning pegs, sometimes with a figure-8 shaped body.

The instrument was also known as a fidel or a viuola, although the French name for the instrument, vielle, is generally used. It was one of the most popular instruments of the medieval period, and was used by troubadours and jongleurs from the 13th through the 15th centuries. The vielle possibly derived from the lira, a Byzantine bowed instrument closely related to the rebab, an Arab bowed instrument. There are many medieval illustrations of different types of vielles in manuscripts, sculptures and paintings. Starting in the middle or end of the 15th century, the word vielle was used to refer to the hurdy-gurdy, as a shortened form of its name: vielle à roue ("vielle with a wheel").

Several modern groups of musicians have formed into bands to play early music (pre-Baroque), and they sometimes include vielles, or modern reproductions, in their ensembles, together with other instruments such as rebecs and saz.

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I've Developed Perfectly Logical Modal Associations. Listen!
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Weber / Flatiron Mandolin For Sale

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Very fine sounding mandolin with great volume and good tone. An adjustable truss rod has replaced the original non-adjustable truss rod. It has just been fret dressed, fitted with a Brekke bridge, and set-up properly by our local luthier who has 35 years experience. A Cumberland pick guard has been added. The strap and arm rest in the photo are included as well as a HSC. Has J74's on it. If you are not familiar with Flatiron mandolins see Brad Laird's blog at: http://www.bradleylaird.com/blog-articles/blog-22-flatiron-bro.html. It is in excellent condition with the normal wear expected from a well taken care of 24 year old mandolin. There is however about a quarter sized spot of pick rash under the pick guard where it can not be seen.”
Contact Info:
Tim Logan 480-695-2436 15 Town Farm Road Shutesbury Nz7c.ham@gmail.com
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